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The Iconic Australian Designer You Need to Know About Now

The Iconic Australian Designer You Need to Know About Now
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The mesmerizing wallpapers, fabrics, and textiles by pioneering 20th-century Australian designer Florence Broadhurst, together with the mysteries surrounding her life, intrigued Shannon and Thatcher Davis, the husband-and-wife duo behind innovative home design firm Selamat. “She was a force,” says Shannon, who with Thatcher worked closely with Signature Design Archive in Sydney to reimagine a number of Florence Broadhurst prints into furniture and accents that go beyond throw pillows and upholstered chairs. “What was exciting for us was that Florence wasn’t a furniture designer,” explains Thatcher. “So it was about how we can take those prints and incorporate them into furniture, accessories, and art.”

We caught up with Shannon and Thatcher at their San Francisco home—where we also got a first look at many of these pieces.

At their family home in San Francisco, Shannon and Thatcher Davis, who head up design firm Selamat, live with many of their own creations—which include the Florence Broadhurst-inspired table lamp and chair, the jute mirror, and the lacquered console in their foyer.

At their family home in San Francisco, Shannon and Thatcher Davis, who head up design firm Selamat, live with many of their own creations—which include the Florence Broadhurst-inspired table lamp and chair, the jute mirror, and the lacquered console in their foyer.

How did you start working with the Florence Broadhurst archives?
Shannon: “About a year and a half ago, our lead designer, Anna, and Thatcher were in Singapore, and they saw one of the prints on a throw pillow. It started this treasure hunt. We followed it back and finally got in touch with the archives, which is based in Sydney. They had restored all of her prints—the original screens—and they also digitized the prints and revived the vibrancy of a lot of the patterns. So we started chatting with them about a furniture and accessories collection.”

What’s the most exciting part about reimagining her designs right now?
Thatcher: “Florence Broadhurst is well known in Australia, a little less so in Europe, and lesser so in the U.S. A lot of people recognize the prints, but they don’t know the story and the woman behind them.”

“We love mixing materials in our designs,” says Shannon of the marble-and-carved-wood ottoman depicting Broadhurst’s Fruit Vine pattern. The pillows are also from Selamat’s Broadhurst line; the rug is by Vivienne Westwood for The Rug Company.

“We love mixing materials in our designs,” says Shannon of the marble-and-carved-wood ottoman depicting Broadhurst’s Fruit Vine pattern. The pillows are also from Selamat’s Broadhurst line; the rug is by Vivienne Westwood for The Rug Company.

What became the greatest inspiration from her archive?
Shannon: “Our designs really follow Florence’s biography. She was born in Outback Australia. She moved to Shanghai in the Roaring ’20s and became a showgirl. Then she moved to London and became a clothing designer. When she moved back to Sydney, it was the ’60s and ’70s when she started making these large-format wallpaper prints—and she didn’t start designing them until she was 60.”

What was the greatest challenge you encountered?
Shannon: “We knew we needed to treat the work with kid gloves. You have to maintain the integrity of the pattern.”
Thatcher: “It was unique for us because we’ve never designed a furniture or accessory collection purely around prints. So we had to come up with some creative ways.”

How do you hope people use these pieces in their home?
Shannon: “I want them to be part of their design story. I want someone to set up a bar on one piece, I want a light fixture to be just a little bit of color in another person’s room… These pieces are meant to be lived with. We tried to make them not statement pieces alone but pieces that can fall into a room and find themselves among friends.”

Any personal favorites?
Thatcher: “The Pyramids credenza. And I really like the Shanghai credenza. It’s a simple case piece, but the hardware just makes it stand out.”
Shannon: “I love the Steps chair. I think it allows people to see rattan in a modern, sleek way that I love. I’m also a sucker for that Stampede pattern—I love those Stampede sculptures.”

A corner captures the couple’s flair for eclectic vignettes. Here, a painting by Carol Benson Cobb is displayed with a Selamat stool and sideboard; the glazed ceramic elephant was a gift.

A corner captures the couple’s flair for eclectic vignettes. Here, a painting by Carol Benson Cobb is displayed with a Selamat stool and sideboard; the glazed ceramic elephant was a gift.

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The showstopping dining room is wallpapered in Broadhurst’s signature Birds of Paradise print. “There are so many hidden things in it: a male bird with the regal tail, a female bird perched on opposing branches,” says Shannon.

The showstopping dining room is wallpapered in Broadhurst’s signature Birds of Paradise print. “There are so many hidden things in it: a male bird with the regal tail, a female bird perched on opposing branches,” says Shannon.

A iron chair, inspired by Roman aqueduct arches, sits beneath a limited-edition Japanese Fans print from the Broadhurst archives. “It was a present from the keeper of the original Broadhurst screens, David and Helen Lennie,” Shannon tells us.

A iron chair, inspired by Roman aqueduct arches, sits beneath a limited-edition Japanese Fans print from the Broadhurst archives. “It was a present from the keeper of the original Broadhurst screens, David and Helen Lennie,” Shannon tells us.

What was exciting for us was that Florence wasn’t a furniture designer, so there were no actual furniture designs. There were ideas and concepts, periods of time, and these great bold prints. So it was about how we can take those prints and incorporate them into furniture, accessories, and art.

— Thatcher Davis
A chair in a Broadhurst floral is paired with a sculptural console that mimics one of the designer’s geometrics. “It’s completely changed the feel of our dining room to add a really dark color,” says Shannon. “It’s made the room feel richer while serving the same function.”

A chair in a Broadhurst floral is paired with a sculptural console that mimics one of the designer’s geometrics. “It’s completely changed the feel of our dining room to add a really dark color,” says Shannon. “It’s made the room feel richer while serving the same function.”

What do you hope the collection does for Florence’s legacy?
Shannon: “I hope that it becomes inspiration for people to think about her patterns in a very contemporary and modern way. They’re so relevant creatively in the world we’re living in, and her biography inspires the idea that life experience can be recorded in patterns.”

The wildest story you discovered about her?
Thatcher: “Her unsolved [murder] mystery is obviously very salacious. But I loved her moving to England, changing her name, and affecting a French accent. I always found that fascinating.”
Shannon: “After she had concocted that ruse and infiltrated nobility in England, when the Queen came to Sydney in the early ’70s, Florence actually had tea with her.”

If she were here now, what’s one question you’d ask her?
Thatcher: “How do you want your martini?”
Shannon: “Why wallpaper? That’d be mine.”

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The family’s favorite gathering spot, the backyard, gets beautiful morning light and is planted with lemon trees and a camellia bush. It’s always entertaining-ready with a dining set and bar cart designed by the couple.

The family’s favorite gathering spot, the backyard, gets beautiful morning light and is planted with lemon trees and a camellia bush. It’s always entertaining-ready with a dining set and bar cart designed by the couple.

How does the Florence collection play into Selamat’s overall design philosophy?
Shannon: “In a lot of ways we wanted this to reflect the evolution of Selamat. It includes a lot of things that we’re known for—rattan, natural materials, we’re using all the same wood resources we use with the Selamat line—yet we treated them very differently and in some ways they’re a bit more formal. It allowed us to spread our wings into areas that previously Selamat didn’t really have in the line.”

What’s next for Selamat?
Thatcher: “This is Florence 1.0. Stay tuned for Florence 2.0.”
Shannon: “You’ll see new textiles, a lot more accessories, art, and lighting, and we’re working on a large upholstery collection. We’ve just scratched the surface.”

Out on the home’s deck, a comfy seating area outfitted with Selamat furniture and pillows is backed with views of the Golden Gate Bridge and the Pacific.

Out on the home’s deck, a comfy seating area outfitted with Selamat furniture and pillows is backed with views of the Golden Gate Bridge and the Pacific.

I hope that the Florence collection becomes inspiration for people to think about her patterns in a very contemporary and modern way… her biography inspires the idea that life experience can be recorded in patterns.

— Shannon Davis
Iconic textiles designer Florence Broadhurst, whose designs were as vibrant and fascinating as her storied life, seated in front of one of her most popular patterns, Peacocks.

Iconic textiles designer Florence Broadhurst, whose designs were as vibrant and fascinating as her storied life, seated in front of one of her most popular patterns, Peacocks.

Who Was Florence Broadhurst?

Born in 1899 in Australia’s Outback, Florence Broadhurst, whose striking wallpaper and textiles made waves during the 1960s and ’70s, is perhaps one of the design world’s most mesmerizing and mysterious figures.

Her trajectory to Florence Broadhurst the designer—she didn’t begin creating wallpapers until she was 60—was an unconventional one. In her early 20s she joined a theater troupe that led her all over Asia and eventually to Shanghai, where she became a showgirl during the Roarin’ ’20s. By her early 30s, she had moved to prewar London, recasting herself as an elegant couturier by the name of Madame Pellier and affecting a French accent. It wasn’t until the 1960s that her wallpaper studio fully took form, her dynamic patterns and vibrant colors establishing her as one of the 20th century’s most influential designers.

And while her prints have garnered a cult following of pattern-lovers, she herself and the finer details of her life have long remained an enigma—even now, nearly 30 years after her still-unsolved murder in 1977.

Top: A room swathed in Broadhurst wallpaper and textiles. The prints from left: Steps, Birds of Paradise, and Japanese Floral. Interior photo courtesy of Woodson & Rummerfield’s House of Design and Jonathan Shapiro

Top: A room swathed in Broadhurst wallpaper and textiles. The prints from left: Steps, Birds of Paradise, and Japanese Floral. Interior photo courtesy of Woodson & Rummerfield’s House of Design and Jonathan Shapiro

Photo courtesy of Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales, and ACP Magazines Ltd.

Photo courtesy of Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales, and ACP Magazines Ltd.

Her Life in Design

Out of her studio and factory between 1961 and 1977, Broadhurst produced some of her most beloved wallpaper prints. From the iconic Japanese Floral to her classically beautiful Birds of Paradise, which required multiple silk screens holding different colors that needed to be precisely aligned (or else the wallpaper rolls would appear mismatched when hung). Meticulously hand-drawn and screen-printed, Broadhurst’s patterns remain as delicate and diverse as ever.

From Shanghai showgirl to London clothing designer, Broadhurst’s ever-changing life was full of glamour and mysteries—and this colorful tome chronicles it all.

From Shanghai showgirl to London clothing designer, Broadhurst’s ever-changing life was full of glamour and mysteries—and this colorful tome chronicles it all.

Life is like a game of bridge—only a dummy puts all his cards on the table.

— Florence Broadhurst
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