Seen & Heard

What We Loved This Week

What We Love from Around the Web…

Touring a celebrated landscape designer’s gardens in Italy.

A fragrant dispatch from the perfume capital of the world.

Inside a Caribbean home decorated almost entirely with bamboo.

A San Francisco pied-à-terre gets a pretty, polished, and colorful new look.

Crispy fritters, fresh salsa, and 55 more recipe ideas to use up all that sweet summer corn.

Photo by David Tsay.

Photo by David Tsay.

What We’ve Been Up To…

Soaring temps have us craving a late-summer escape—and a quiet retreat in the countryside sounds just right. Of course, we know it’s not always possible to get away, so we’ve gathered the inspiration and pieces you need to recreate the look right at home.

We’d be remiss to talk about relaxed countryside style without mentioning Vermont, a place where the farmhouse look reigns. Twin Farms hotel in Barnard is downright dreamy, with its exposed wooden beams and polished decor. And just down in the road in Woodstock is Farmhouse Pottery, whose handcrafted wares are the epitome of all-American charm.

If a European take is more your speed, then ticking stripes, copper kitchenware, and weathered wood furnishings will help you channel a classic French country aesthetic (just add chilled rosé).

Elizabeth Graves with Martha Stewart. Photo by Liz Banfield.

Elizabeth Graves with Martha Stewart. Photo by Liz Banfield.

We Caught Up With…

Martha Stewart Living editor-in-chief Elizabeth Graves

Home is where my family is. It’s where I recharge and find comfort surrounded by things I love.

— Elizabeth Graves

Read our full Q&A with Elizabeth →

A collection of kilim rugs stitched together makes for a dramatic foundation in an oversize room. Photo by Nicole LaMotte.

A collection of kilim rugs stitched together makes for a dramatic foundation in an oversize room. Photo by Nicole LaMotte.

A Parting Piece of Knowledge…

Kilim rugs—the tapestry-woven foundations that come in seemingly endless colors and designs—originated more than 2000 years ago in the Middle East and Central Asia. Their purpose was twofold: as an element of interior decor and as prayer rugs for religious ceremonies. Typically made of wool, these flat-weaves are incredibly durable; a 100-year-old kilim might very well last another century, even in the most high-traffic areas of your home. In the past decade, these styles have seen a major resurgence, thanks in part to the popularity of the bohemian-eclectic look. And while they’re most often found adding color and texture underfoot, you’ll also see them upholstered onto furnishings or turned into pillow covers.

Shop all kilim styles →

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