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Ashley Pittman

    • Native Materials

      As a volunteer for the Clinton Health Access Initiative, Pittman became mesmerized by the “striking beauty and color variations” in Kenyan Ankole cow horns. Determined to create a product that could provide locals steady employment, she began sourcing horn from sustainably farmed cattle (used as a food source) for artisans to craft her designs.

      “Our collection celebrates artisan skills and promotes entrepreneurship.”

      Native Materials
      • Tribal Aesthetic

        Bronze and gemstones, along with horn, define the collection. Each piece is a modern interpretation of the power, simplicity, shapes, and textures seen in centuries-old tribal pieces. “I learned a lot from watching the way African women wear stacks of jewelry,” says Pittman. She suggests similarly layering her baubles, all of which complement each other.

        “There is a connection between the owner of the piece and the hands who made it.”

        Tribal Aesthetic